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(via fuckyeahnorsemythology, syxx)
Bræður munu berjast
og að bönum verðast,
munu systrungar
sifjum spilla.
Hart er í heimi,
hórdómur mikill,
skeggjöld, skálmöld,
skildir klofnar,
vindöld, vargöld
áður veröld steypist
Mun enginn maður öðrum þyrma.
written by Brother shall strike brother and both fall,
Parents shall defile their kin;
Evil be on earth, an age of adultery,
Axe time, sword time,
Of split shields, 
A wind-age, a wolf-age till the world caves in;
No man shall show mercy to another.

The first sign of Ragnarök appears in Gylfaginning in Prose Edda where it tells from a winter called Fimbulvetur. Then snow appears from all directions, biting frost and windy and next three winters stay this way so many battles are fought. 
Giants and demons approaching from all points of the compass will attack the gods, who will meet them and face death like heroes. The sun will be darkened, the stars will vanish, and the earth will sink into the sea. Afterward, the earth will rise again, the innocent Baldur will return from the dead, and the hosts of the just will live in a hall roofed with gold.
Ragnarök



Ragnarök is end of the world in norse mythology and means “the gods fate” 
The main sources for Ragnarök is the Poetic Edda, Völuspá and Vafþrúðnismál. 
The word Ragnarök means literally judgment of the gods, or the gods fate. The word Ragnarök is related to the words Rögn which means God(pagan god), and rök which means an end, or something to be decided (to end). 

Bræður munu berjast
og að bönum verðast,
munu systrungar
sifjum spilla.
Hart er í heimi,
hórdómur mikill,
skeggjöld, skálmöld,
skildir klofnar,
vindöld, vargöld
áður veröld steypist
Mun enginn maður öðrum þyrma.

Brother shall strike brother and both fall,
Parents shall defile their kin;
Evil be on earth, an age of adultery,
Axe time, sword time,
Of split shields, 
A wind-age, a wolf-age till the world caves in;
No man shall show mercy to another.


The first sign of Ragnarök appears in Gylfaginning in Prose Edda where it tells from a winter called Fimbulvetur. Then snow appears from all directions, biting frost and windy and next three winters stay this way so many battles are fought. 
Giants and demons approaching from all points of the compass will attack the gods, who will meet them and face death like heroes. The sun will be darkened, the stars will vanish, and the earth will sink into the sea. Afterward, the earth will rise again, the innocent Baldur will return from the dead, and the hosts of the just will live in a hall roofed with gold.

The photo is of Fortíð’s album number three. A good fellow of mine wrote three albums with all the poems from Völuspá, and this album is about the fall of the ages. This song contains the lyrics above 

 

Sleipnir - Odin’s horse. The name Sleipnir means the one who run’s fast or simply the runner. In Old icelandic/norse Gammvakur. That means the horse is powerful and even hard for the rider to make the horse relax.Interesting is, the name Sleipnir is still used today for many horses. I bought this horse couple of years ago from a farmer and its name was Sleipnir. Of course I didn’t change his name. His name quite suits his personality. He is really fast and powerful.More photos here : http://www.flickr.com/photos/ulfynja/
917 notes
Northern lights are so beautiful. This photo is taken in Jökulsárlón, Iceland. Freyja had a lot of responsibility. She helped with childbirth, the seasons, cats, Seers, war, death, magic, prophecy and love, holding a Venus like quality. As much as Freyja had a softer quality, loving beautiful flower arrangements and romantic music, she also was the Goddess of War and Death. When she rode into battle with the Valkyries, their armor would flicker with light, which became known as the Aurora Borealis, or Northern Lights.
Idun by Arthur Rackham
“Then they all laughed except for Tyr,” Snorri writes. “He lost his hand.”
Odin saying his last goodbyes at Baldurs funeral